Diabetes Type 2 Horizon Scanning Vol 3 Issue 7

August 8, 2011

The Early ACTID randomised controlled trial

August 8, 2011

Title: Diet or diet plus physical activity versus usual care in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes: the Early ACTID randomised controlled trial

Source: The Lancet, Volume 378, Issue 9786, Pages 129 – 139, 9 July 2011

Follow this link to view the abstract

Date of publication:  July 2011

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Glycaemic control in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients can be improved with intensive diet according to this RCT of 593 patients. After 6 months researchers found glycaemic control had worsened in patients assigned to usual care whilst an intensive diet intervention soon after diagnosis can improve glycaemic control. The addition of an activity intervention delivered no additional benefit.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes:  If you cannot access this article with your NHS Athens, please contact your local NHS Library using this link.


Statins and Diabetes

August 8, 2011

Source: NursingTimes.net

Follow this link to view the full text

Date of publication: June 2011

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The Daily Mail reported that people taking intensive courses of statins, the cholesterol-lowering medicines, are 12% more likely to develop diabetes type 2. This Nursing times article reviews these claims in light of the original meta-analysis findings.

Length of publication: 1 web page

Some important notes: Follow this link  to view the abstract of original study “Risk of Incident Diabetes With Intensive-Dose Compared With Moderate-Dose Statin Therapy” (2011) JAMA 22nd June

If you cannot access this article with your NHS Athens, please contact your local NHS Library using this link.


Effect of Computer-Generated Tailored Feedback on Glycemic Control in People With Diabetes in the Community

August 8, 2011

Source: Diabetes Care. Published online before print June 16, 2011, doi: 10.2337/dc11-0006

Follow this link to view the abstract

Date of publication: June 2011

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Describes a Canadian RCT in which participants were randomly allocated to either receive or not receive periodic computer-generated, evidence-based feedback designed to facilitate improved glycemic control and diabetes self-management. No between-group differences in measures of quality of life, diabetes self-management behaviors, or clinical outcomes were observed. The researchers add that future research may investigate the mode of delivering feedback (social networking, email, texts) and the intensity of the message (greater emphasis on individualizing feedback) to determine the impact on overall management..

Length of publication: unknown

Some Important Notes: If you cannot access this article with your NHS Athens, please contact your local NHS Library using this link.


Targeting intensive glycaemic control versus targeting conventional glycaemic control for type 2 diabetes mellitus

August 8, 2011

Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 6. Hemmingsen B et al

Follow this link to view the full text

Date of publication:  June 2011

Publication type: Systematic review

In a nutshell: Authors concluded that “The included trials did not show significant differences for all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality when targeting intensive glycaemic control compared with conventional glycaemic control. Targeting intensive glycaemic control reduced the risk of microvascular complications while increasing the risk of hypoglycaemia. Furthermore, intensive glycaemic control might reduce the risk of non-fatal myocardial infarction in trials exclusively dealing with glycaemic control in usual care settings”

Length of publication: 240 pages

Acknowledgements: Cinahl


Comparing foreign-born South Asians and other Asians with U.S.-born whites, blacks, and Hispanics

August 8, 2011

Source: Diabetes Care. Published online before print June 29, 2011, doi: 10.2337/dc11-0088

Follow this link to view the abstract

Date of publication: June 2011

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Using data from the New York City 2002–2008 Community Health Surveys, the researchers found that the prevalence of diabetes among foreign-born South Asians was nearly twice that of foreign-born other Asians.  They conclude that evaluating Asians as one group masks the higher diabetes burden among South Asians. Researchers and clinicians should be aware of differences in this population.

Length of publication: unknown

Some Important Notes: If you cannot access this article with your NHS Athens, please contact your local NHS Library using this link.


Further dissemination

August 8, 2011

If you think anyone would benefit from receiving this posting or from subscribing to this newsletter please email them the link and suggest they sign up to stay up-to-date with new content. Contact your local NHS library for any assistance.

Follow this link to find your local NHS library