HbA1c is not always reliable in estimating glycaemic control

January 10, 2017

Source: Practical Diabetes

Follow this link to read an abstract

Date of publication: Dec 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Glycated haemoglobin, though a robust marker, can sometimes lead to the wrong interpretation of glycaemic control and may result in serious errors. It is essential clinicians are aware of the conditions that can affect HbA1c.

Some important notes: This article may be available via NHS Athens or through your local NHS Library. To search for your nearest library, please see http://www.hlisd.org/


Effect modification in the relation between HbA1c and cardiovascular disease and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes

December 5, 2016

Source: Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism

Follow this link to read an abstract

Date of publication: 2 Nov 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Strict glycemic control has been shown to reduce cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes, but may also be associated with increased mortality in certain subgroups.

Some important notes: This article may be available via NHS Athens or through your local NHS Library. To search for your nearest library, please see http://www.hlisd.org/


Short- and medium-term effects of light to moderate alcohol intake on glycaemic control in diabetes mellitus

September 8, 2016

Source: Diabetic Medicine

Follow this link to read an abstract

Date of publication: September 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: People with diabetes are told that drinking alcohol may increase their risk of hypoglycaemia.

Some important notes: This article may be available via NHS Athens or through your local NHS Library. To search for your nearest library, please see http://www.hlisd.org/


Association between glycaemic control and common infections in people with Type 2 diabetes

August 30, 2016

Source: Diabetic Medicine

Follow this link to read an abstract of the article

Date of publication: August 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Almost all infections analysed were more common in people with Type 2 diabetes. Infections that are most commonly of bacterial, fungal or yeast origin were more frequent in people with worse glycaemic control.

Some important notes: This article may be available via NHS Athens or through your local NHS Library. To search for your nearest library, please see http://www.hlisd.org/


Infection risk in elderly people with reduced glycaemic control

April 25, 2016

Source: Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology

Follow this link to read the article

Date of publication: 1 April 2016

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The effect of glycaemic control on infection rates in people with diabetes was assessed, concluding that poor control is associated with increased infection rates. The investigators emphasised the paucity of studies specifically analysing the
effect of glycaemic control on infection rates in elderly people (age >70 years).

Some important notes: This article may be available via NHS Athens or through your local NHS Library.  To search for your nearest library, please see http://www.hlisd.org/


The effect of frailty should be considered in the management plan of older people with Type 2 diabetes

March 18, 2016

Source: Future Science 2016;2(1)

Follow this link to read the abstract

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Recurrent hypoglycaemia in frail older people with diabetes is a marker of vulnerability and hypoglycaemic medication review or even complete withdrawal is appropriate in this group of patients.

Some important notes: This article may be available via NHS Athens or through your local NHS Library.  To search for your nearest library, please see http://www.hlisd.org/


A review of glycaemic control in older adults with type 2 diabetes

March 16, 2016

Source: JAMA 2016;315(10):1034-1045

Follow this link to read the abstract

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: For the majority of older adults, an HbA1c target between 7.5% and 9% will maximize benefits and minimize harms.

Some important notes: This article may be available via NHS Athens or through your local NHS Library.  To search for your nearest library, please see http://www.hlisd.org/