Managing the diabetic foot

November 27, 2015

Source: Nursing in Practice

Follow this link to read the article

Date of publication: 24 November 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: It can be demonstrated that reducing the risk of foot problems is multi-faceted. Local commissioning groups need to invest and provide an integrated foot care pathway that staff have access to. This can hopefully improve the overall quality of life for the person with diabetes, and help to reduce the burden on healthcare nationally.

 

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Diabetics suffer 200,000 complications per year

August 27, 2015

Source: OnMedica

Follow this link to the document

Date of publication: 25 August 2015

Publication type: News story

Length of publication: 1 web page

In a nutshell: People with diabetes experience almost 200,000 serious complications per year such as amputation, heart attack or stroke, according to new analysis by Diabetes UK.


Cost effectiveness of telehealth for patients with long term conditions

May 7, 2013

Source: BMJ (Published 22 March 2013)

Link to full text

Date of publication: Mar 2013

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This economic evaluation of the Whole Systems Demonstrator telehealth questionnaire study concludes that telehealth does not seem to be a cost effective addition to standard support and treatment.  The original study included 3230 people with a long term condition (heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or diabetes).

Length of publication: 19 page pdf


Cost-effectiveness of substituting physicians with diabetes nurse specialists

August 9, 2012

Source: Journal of Advanced Nursing, June 2012, vol./is. 68/6(1224-1234)

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: June 2012

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This randomized controlled trial with 2-year follow-up concluded that nurse specialists give diabetes care that is similar to care provided by physicians in terms of quality of life and economic value.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: You will need to subscribe to the journal to access the full text, follow this link to contact your local NHS library for assistance.


Productivity Considerations for Service Design: Diabetes

April 7, 2011

Source: Map of Medicine

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: March 2011

Publication type: Beta product

In a nutshell: This document should be used to achieve specific productivity improvements in Diabetes service design whilst maintaining the quality and safety of clinical care. This approach is being trialled as a beta product alongside the Map of Medicine Diabetes pathway, which covers all areas of a patient’s care.

Length of publication: 3 pages


Incentivising Wellness: Improving the treatment of long-term conditions

February 6, 2011

Source: Policy Exchange

Follow this link for the full text

Date of publication: Nov 2010

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: This report shows how the NHS can save tens of billions of pounds while also taking better care of one of the UK’s fastest-growing diseases – diabetes.
The report calls for new business models to be introduced to the NHS in a bid to harness modern technology like insulin pumps and telemonitoring that can help diabetes sufferers stay out of hospital and stop their condition getting worse.

Length of publication: 42p pdf


Cost-effectiveness of self-monitoring of blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes

March 7, 2010

Source: CMAJ, 182 (1) p. 28-34

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: January 2010

Publication type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: The researchers sought to determine the cost effectiveness of self-monitoring for patients with type 2 diabetes not using insulin. They used the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) model to forecast diabetes-related complications, corresponding quality-adjusted life years and costs (although results appear in dollars).  They concluded that for most patients with type 2 diabetes not using insulin, use of blood glucose test strips for frequent self-monitoring ( 7 times per week) was unlikely to represent efficient use of resources.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Acknowledgement: Modernmedicine