The relationship among breakfast time, morningness–eveningness preference and body mass index in Type 2 diabetes

April 30, 2018

Source: Diabetic Medicine

Follow this link to read an abstract

Date of publication: Apr 18

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Obesity is prevalent and related to poor outcomes in Type 2 diabetes. Evening preference and late meal times have been shown to be associated with obesity, but data are lacking in people with Type 2 diabetes. This study examined the relationship among meal timing, morningness–eveningness preference and BMI in Type 2 diabetes, using a mediation analysis.

Some important notes: This article may be available via NHS Athens or through your local NHS Library. To search for your nearest library, please see http://www.hlisd.org/

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A big breakfast could aid weight loss, glucose control

April 3, 2018

Source: MNT

Follow this link to read

Date of publication: Mar 18

Publication type: News story

In a nutshell: You may have heard that breakfast is “the most important meal of the day,” and a new study helps to support this. It found that eating a big breakfast and reducing lunch and dinner size may be key for people looking to lose weight and improve their blood glucose levels.


Characterizing adults with Type 2 diabetes mellitus and intellectual disability

February 26, 2018

Source: Diabetic Medicine

Follow this link to read an abstract

Date of publication: Feb 18

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: To report the results of a case-finding study conducted during a feasibility trial of a supported self-management intervention for adults with mild to moderate intellectual disability and Type 2 diabetes mellitus, and to characterize the study sample in terms of diabetes control, health, and access to diabetes management services and support.

Some important notes: This article may be available via NHS Athens or through your local NHS Library. To search for your nearest library, please see http://www.hlisd.org/


Beyond “Just Eat Less, Exercise More”: Obesity Treatment in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

December 11, 2017

Source: Diabetes Spectrum

Follow this link to read an abstract

Date of publication: November 2017

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Obesity is perhaps the strongest risk factor and contributor to type 2 diabetes. Approximately 90% of patients with type 2 diabetes have a BMI >25 kg/m2. The risk of type 2 diabetes increases geometrically with increasing BMI.

Some important notes: This article may be available via NHS Athens or through your local NHS Library. To search for your nearest library, please see http://www.hlisd.org/


Novel therapies in type 2 diabetes: insulin resistance

June 19, 2017

Source: Practical Diabetes

Follow this link to read an abstract

Date of publication: June 17

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Insulin resistance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Obesity is a major risk factor for the development of insulin resistance. Hence, treating obesity with lifestyle interventions is the cornerstone of managing insulin resistance.

Some important notes: This article may be available via NHS Athens or through your local NHS Library. To search for your nearest library, please see http://www.hlisd.org/


Study finds major health benefits linked to indoor temperature variation

May 3, 2017

Source: MNT

Follow this link to read

Date of publication: Apr 17

Publication type: News story

In a nutshell: Exposure to environments outside a comfortable temperature could help tackle major metabolic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity, and should be reflected in modern building practices, finds a study published in Building Research & Information.


Obesity exacerbates type 2 diabetes-related brain abnormalities

May 3, 2017

Source: MNT

Follow this link to read

Date of publication: Apr 17

Publication type: News story

In a nutshell: People with type 2 diabetes who are overweight or obese are more likely to have exacerbated and progressive abnormalities in the structure of their brains and cognition, find researchers.